Genzyme announces multi-year multiple sclerosis research collaboration

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Genzyme has announced the formation of a research collaboration with Cleveland Clinic focused on developing new therapeutic approaches to the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

According to a company release, this innovative collaboration aligns the research efforts of both organisations around projects which are designed to develop a deep understanding of the pathogenesis and progression of multiple sclerosis and to address the unmet medical needs in multiple sclerosis, particularly progressive forms of the disease. Initially the collaboration will focus on projects that explore strategies to address neurodegeneration, a hallmark of progressive multiple sclerosis, and novel technologies to better understand the pathology of the disease. The collaboration will be led by a joint steering committee comprised of Genzyme and Cleveland Clinic researchers and span a minimum of five years.

 


“As leaders in multiple sclerosis we want to advance and build a sustainable pipeline of novel therapeutic approaches, and our collaboration with Cleveland Clinic, along with our internal research and development efforts, reinforce Genzyme’s long-term commitment to the multiple sclerosis community,” says David Meeker, president and chief executive officer, Genzyme. “We are excited to work collaboratively with a premier research and health care institution that has made many important contributions to better understanding this complex and devastating disease.”

 


Cleveland Clinic’s Mellen Center for Multiple Sclerosis has one of the largest and most comprehensive programmes for multiple sclerosis care and research worldwide, managing more than 20,000 patient visits every year. The Center has a highly innovative and active research team, which has been at the forefront of multiple sclerosis advances for the past two decades.

 


“This collaboration will allow for the development of innovative approaches to evaluate potential new therapies for progressive MS,” says Jeffrey Cohen, director of the Experimental Therapeutics Programme at the Mellen Center for Multiple Sclerosis.

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