Radiofrequency targeted vertebral augmentation shows lower cement leakage rate compared to vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty

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A new study suggests that cement augmentation using radiofrequency targeted vertebral augmentation (RF-TVA) with the StabiliT system (DFine) may provide a lower leakage rate than vertebroplasty and balloon kyphoplasty in the treatment of vertebral compression fractures. The results reported no leakage in 69% of the radiofrequency targeted vertebral augmentation group, compared to 53% and 41% in the vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty groups respectively. All leaks identified were asymptomatic.

Bassem Georgy, interventional neuroradiologist and assistant clinical professor of radiology, Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, USA, presented the findings at the 2nd joint meeting of the European Society of Neuroradiology (ESNR) and American Society of Spine Radiology (ASSR) in Barcelona, Spain, this week.

 

“The study shows that cement augmentation using this technique may provide a lower leakage rate when compared to conventional vertebroplasty with high viscosity cement and standard balloon kyphoplasty,” Georgy said. “These results may be related to the unique combination of controlled delivery of a radiofrequency-activated (very high viscosity) cement at a fixed flow rate after creation of multiple channels using the navigational osteotome that allows targeted cement delivery. The DFine system also allows uni-pedicular access and remotely controlled injection to decrease the risk of radiation exposure.”

 

Study overview


In this study, researchers performed a rigorous radiographic analysis to compare the incidence of cement leakage in cases treated with vertebroplasty using high-viscosity cement, standard balloon kyphoplasty and radiofrequency targeted vertebral augmentation using the StabiliT vertebral augmentation system.

 

Post-operative radiographs of 101 consecutive patients (151 levels ranging from the third thoracic vertebra through the fifth lumbar vertebra), were evaluated for cement leakage using a stringent diagnostic technique. Three minimally invasive techniques were evaluated: ‘high viscosity’ vertebroplasty (66 levels), balloon kyphoplasty (49 levels) and RF-TVA (39 levels).


In each case optimal cement fill of the vertebral body was attempted. No leakage was reported in 69% of the radiofrequency targeted vertebral augmentation group, compared to 53% and 41% in the vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty groups respectively. All leaks identified were asymptomatic.

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