Highest level evidence indicates better outcomes when using iMRI for brain tumour surgery

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In a recently published article in the journal Neurosurgery the use of VISIUS intraoperative MRI (iMRI) in brain tumour surgery has been proven to result in complete tumour removal in more patients with glioma tumours. 

Led by Jin-song Wu, the neurosurgical team at Huashan Hospital at Fudan University in Shanghai, China, conducted the study.

The prospective, parallel, randomised, triple-blind controlled trial design provides the most objective data and therefore highest level evidence to date of the value of iMRI in treating both low and high-grade gliomas. The early results reinforce that high-field iMRI-guided surgery is more effective in achieving complete resection than conventional neuronavigation-guided surgery. Other published studies on high-field iMRI have been mainly retrospective.

“iMRI is a practical and valuable asset to increasing the extent of resection for cerebral gliomas, with a specific significant influence for low grade gliomas,” Wu says. “With trends to statistical significance, these early results are the highest level of iMRI evidence for glioma surgery now available. This leads to more improved overall survivability and quality of life than using conventional neuronavigation.”

The low-grade glioma (LGG) subgroup patients who were treated in a VISIUS Surgical Theatre using iMRI had a statistically significant complete resection rate of 82% compared to 43% for the control group of conventional surgery patients. For the high-grade glioma (HGG) patients, 91% of those treated with iMRI had complete resection compared to 73% for the control group. These results are confirmed by volumetric analysis. The LGG subgroup met the endpoint early and that arm of the study stopped enrolling additional patients. The study continues for HGG patients.

Jay D Miller, IMRIS CEO and president, notes: “Clearly these studies continue to show the benefit of having the level of MR imaging the IMRIS solution provides inside the operating room without moving the patient. We know certain surgeons will not do these types of procedures without being in our surgical suites. In time, use of VISIUS iMRI will develop into a standard of care in these cases.”

More than 1,000 patient procedures have been completed using the Fudan University iMRI since its installation in September 2010, the company reports.